Posted by: Geoff Jackson | October 1, 2007

Kokoda Track Training

Time to up the anti with my training for Kokoda’s 24 hour race.

The idea of completing a 100km trek within 7 -10 days sounds ominous, the fact of considering doing that same trek within 24 hours non stop as a race doesn’t sound humanly possible. The reality, it is. The 2007 Winner completed the Kokoda 24 hour Race in 17.5 hours. “Unbelievable”and still alive to tell the tale…

Over the past few weeks trying to get my head around the idea of doing the Kokoda Track I had some interesting questions come up.

1. Running in the dark and now having tried it with a torch, found it doesn’t work very well.

2. What does your body really need to sustain a race pace for 24 hours?

3. Is the fella who completed Kokoda in 17.5 hour an Alien?

4. What do I really need to do, to be race ready and complete 100km event in 24 hours?

If you have any feedback or tips on what has work for you please share.

Enjoying the View

Geoff Jackson

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Responses

  1. 1. Running in the dark and now having tried it with a torch, found it doesn’t work very well. Your night vision will work itself out…eat plenty of carrots and practice running at night. Have a look at the moon states when the race is scheduled..train in like moon states (full v half etc)

    2. What does your body really need to sustain a race pace for 24 hours? – You won’t know until you do it….this is why you need to do a similar event prior. Train hard, fight easy is a good analogy here. Try and complete a 36 hour event prior – then Kokoda will be easy.

    3. Is the fella who completed Kokoda in 17.5 hour an Alien? Possibly, but they don’t test for aliens prior to the race…so you may need to prepare for this also. If they don’t test for aliens; fair chance they don’t test for well prepared, confident freaks like you neither….

    4. What do I really need to do, to be race ready and complete 100km event in 24 hours? You need to do a like event first! No marathon runner EVER runs their first marathon up to expectation – it takes 3-4 marathons to get the time they were after, as physical fatigue is actually one SMALL concern..there is a whole heap of OTHER logistical factors that can ruin your day eg. do I wear a nappy etc? Be patient Skywalker, be patient…

  2. Not sure if I can help, having not been an elite endurance event competitor or adventure race participant but I may be able to assist if you haven’t discovered answers to your questions already.

    My running days ended some 10 years ago or more when I did my last triathlon but I’ve continued to cycle, attend karate training twice a week, swim some mornings and train for Kokoda treks each year.

    I’ve now completed the Kokoda Track 10 times so far, including a double crossing (both directions back to back) in 2007. I guide groups across the track 2-3 times per year and assist them personally with their preparation.

    I’m not sure if you’ve walked the track yet? Hopefully you have, as it would not be a good idea to race on it without first having walked it a few times at the same time of year as the event which I think is July.

    Its very different to any off road terrain I’ve ever experienced in Australia or New Zealand.
    Extremely steep (you’re either going up or down – not much flat) every inch of the track is covered in slippery tree roots, mud and often water. Humidity is very high and its easy to get lost if you don’t know the way when you come to a junction or are running through the Ule Ule Creek section which requires you to cross the same creek 23 times.

    Some of the hills take 2-3 hrs to walk up, so you could be trying to running for 30-60minutes non-stop up hill or down which will give your knees a good workout.

    Endurance is one thing but the track also takes a big toll on the tendons and ligaments in the feet, ankles and knees (especially going down hill)

    The best preparation would be to spend a month up there running different sections of the track.

    Aside from that, find some steep slippery, muddy hills and run up and down them as much as you can. Do lots of one legged squats to strengthen the stabiliser muscles in your legs and finally, follow a local during the race if you can keep up – they are amazingly well adapted to the environment!

    good luck with it!

    regards

    Wayne – http://www.freespiritadventures.com.au

  3. Its really a wonderful blog and the video and collection of edited photo also looking very good…..The responses are given here in this website that is very much important to make a strong friend circle..Kokoda Treks


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